Tag Archive | MBA

Investment Banking Interview Preparation

For undergrads and MBA students, the news that they have been selected for an interview at an investment bank comes with both excitement and dread. A position as an analyst or associate in corporate finance can be the first step towards a highly successful and highly lucrative career. Investment banking interviews, however, can be some of the most intimidating interviews out there, so let’s take a look at how to get prepared.

Before we jump into interview practice mode, we should take a step back and think about how we want to come across in the interview. In short, investment banking candidates should come off as bright, confident and likable.

In the final cut of selecting a hire, investment banks have already determined which candidates are smart and capable, so the decision comes down to who they like the best. So in addition to knowing a thing or two, candidates must remember to come across as a fun person to work with as well.

Know Your Story

Like any interview, candidates should have stories prepared about their lives that discuss their past, present and future. These are great answers for the standard questions:

“Tell me about yourself.” Or “Walk me through your rsum.” “Why are you interested in investment banking or this firm?” “Where do you see yourself in five to ten years?”

Candidates are highly likely to receive these or similar questions in any interview, and having succinct, practiced answers to them will give the impression of a polished candidate.

Your past story should highlight events that have qualified you for or gotten you interested in investment banking. Your present story should demonstrate why you want the particular position, how it is a logical step from where you are coming from and perhaps touch on where you hope the position will lead.

Your future story should discuss how investment banking will lead to where you want to go. Good future ambitions might be a managing director position in investment banking, a principle at a private equity firm, a CFO or perhaps and entrepreneur. In any case, you should communicate that those are long-term ambitions and you look forward to the experiences you’ll have in the position you’re interviewing for.

Know the Industry and Firm

Where investment banking interviews begin to get trickier is that firms will expect you to know what you’re getting into. If you confuse an equity analyst position with an analyst position in corporate finance, for example, you will not make it any further in the process.

You should understand the major divisions within an investment bank – sales & trading, corporate finance, research, etc. You should understand the hierarchy of positions within corporate finance – analyst, associate, vice president, managing director – and what each position does.

At the macro level, you need to understand the major differences between bulge bracket investment banks, middle market and boutique investment banks. You should also have a good answer for why you would prefer one type over another (and be sure that you prefer the type you’re interviewing with).

Role of Management Education in Shaping Future Managers and Entrepreneurs

When we talk of management education, we are basically referring to shaping up the students, aimed towards developing their competency and capability either as a manager fit to join an organization and help it to grow or as entrepreneur, to establish and grow ones own business. This capability does not come from possessing a management diploma or degree, but also requires developing in the students the will and skill to contribute for self sustenance and nation building. Presently it is seen, that there is a wide gap existing between the type of management education imparted in MBA colleges and what is there in real life management in business organizations. In order to make management education more realistic and useful for the industry, certain key areas need to be identified. These could be:-

(a)Benchmarking quality management education to create an enduring quality managers and entrepreneurs.
(b)Bring in professionalism in management education.
(c)Adequacy of qualified and competent faculty members, proper infrastructure, support facilities and regular updating of curriculum.

Benchmarking Quality Management Education

Benchmarking with the top management colleges inspires an institute to produce quality managers. Management education needs to include knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA) that are needed today and that will be needed tomorrow by the industry. The mission of management education should be to become innovative and creative. The objectives of benchmarking should be to:-
Make own students employable in industry.
Moving the institute from academic mode to corporate mode. To achieve these objectives the agenda should be:- (a) To identify the industry expectations of the skill sets required of students. (b)To identify the areas of Total Quality Management (TQM) in management education. (c) To identify the changes required in teachers imparting management education.

Professionalism in MBA/PGDM Education

There are many reasons for the wide differences in the quality of management education in different institutes in India. The main reason is the absence of a body that can ensure that the standards set are practiced and retained by all management institutes, like AACSB in USA. We do have an apex body the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), that is responsible for setting the basic framework, guidelines and standards for quality of business education, there are however many problems when it comes implementation of these standard by MBA colleges and institutes and these problems undermine the effectiveness of these standards. In order install quality in management education in India, the AICTE and MBA colleges / universities in the country should focus on the following issues:-
Quality of faculty.
Infrastructure development.
Accountability of management institutes.
Values and ethics.
Role of professional bodies (AIMA, ISTD, etc).